Australian TYA community prepares for the future

We will make works that not only bring our audiences and participants back to hope and fun and meaning, but works that acknowledge and illuminate the differences that will inevitably be part of a new world”

Artists are starting robust conversations about their readiness to create works to shape our future community and society’s relationship to culture and the arts. The ‘liveness’ of performance will be an essential contribution to the reconstruction of social patterns and cultural cohesion. While many artists and companies are making and streaming works in different ways online (can’t hold back that creative spirit), this feels to most like a placeholder, not a new platform for artistic expression. New strategies are needed to make performance and experiences for children and young people possible in this very different and constantly evolving landscape. Artists must be supported so they can survive this time with the ability to remain creative and connected. Meanwhile, we still celebrate creativity and possibility, in every offer. 

We know we are going to be there when the crisis is over. We will make works that not only bring our audiences and participants back to hope and fun and meaning, but works that acknowledge and illuminate the differences that will inevitably be part of a new world. We are equipped for change and uncertainty; already our reflections, concepts and our sense of the future, have shifted and morphed because of what we are going through.   

Areas of positive actions and initiatives that can inspire colleagues in other countries

  • CRISIS CASH FOR ARTISTS FUND 1000 x 1000: CALLING FOR CHAMPION COMPANIES!
    A consortium of companies in the performing arts sector, led by Theatre Network Australia in partnership with Creative Partnerships Australia, are currently working on a fundraising campaign to provide equity bursaries to independent artists who have been adversely affected by COVID-19 and who do not have a financial safety net. Become a Champion Company or Donate Now if you are in a position to do so. Also, feel free to let artists in need know to request support here
  • SOLIDARITY ACROSS THE THEATRE FOR YOUNG AUDIENCES AND YOUTH ARTS SECTOR
    The sector has banded together after the news of the Australia Council’s Four-Year Funding Outcomes. The announcement that only 95 companies would be funded, and 49 offered transitional year-long funding has been difficult for many. The TYA and YA sector is particularly hurt as only one new company, Western Edge Youth Arts, has been funded and yet Polyglot Theatre, Shopfront Youth Arts, Australian Theatre for Young People, St Martins Youth Arts Centre and Barking Gecko have been defunded. Stay tuned for ways to keep connected to the sector and advocate for better outcomes as we move through these tough times.
  • YOUTH ARTS ZOOM
    In March there was a gathering of over 40 organisations and programmes that work with children and young people around Australia, resulting in the development of a survey to collect data around the impact of COVID-19 on our work and our young people.

New and creative ways of connecting to young audiences during this time. 



Photo Nicolas Gonzalez on Unsplash